Projects I'm working on

  • Ancient Roman tweeting.
    This project studies the state-sponsored messaging disseminated on coins across five centuries of the Roman Empire. The fundamental data set is derived from the Online Coins of the Roman Empire (http://numismatics.org/ocre/), “a joint project of the American Numismatic Society and the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University.”

  • “Social networks” in scholia to the Iliad.
    The scholia to the Iliad illuminate the backstories and cultural knowledge shared by the audience of the Homeric poems. This project applies social network analysis to collocations of named entities in the scholia. The project uses archival data from the Homer Multitext project (http://homermultitext.github.io/hmt-archive/), and focuses initially on the uniquely important scholia of the Venetus A manuscript, now available for the first time in a complete edition.

  • Gregorian chant.
    The chant project is editing manuscripts with musical annotation in neumes. Latin text and neumes are represented as parallel texts, with neumes encoded in the Virgapes system (https://github.com/HCMID/chant/wiki/The-Virgapes-System). We can computationally analyze the musical notation or Latin text alone, or in relation to each other.

  • γεωγραφία / geographia / جغرافية.
    The largest scientific dataset surviving from the ancient world is the record of more than 6,000 sites, including longitude-latitude locations, in Claudius Ptolemy’s Geography. The spatial density and precision of Ptolemy’s coordinates, in Greek manuscripts and in translations and extensions of Ptolemy’s work in later Arabic and Latin sources, helps us understand how these data were used by ancient and medieval scientists.

  • Manuscript networks.
    Traditional stemmatic approaches to reconstruct the transmission of texts assume that manuscripts have a single source. This assumption is often demonstrably false, and the logic of stemmatic criticism then fails. This project models networks of interrelated manuscripts to develop a more realistic and nuanced picture of textual transmission. In this approach, each node in the network is a full diplomatic edition of a manuscript.